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Article
April 19, 1902

THE ETIOLOGY AND SPREAD OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(16):979-988. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480160001001
Abstract

THE TYPHOID BACILLUS.  Is typhoid fever due to a specific, well-defined, easily differentiated micro-organism, or are there several varieties of this germ, differing from one another in cultural, tinctorial, and possibly other properties? For many years after the discovery of the Eberth bacillus bacteriologists generally held that the micro-organism causing typhoid fever constitutes a distinct, easily recognizable species. In this country, at least, the writer stood almost or quite alone in claiming that there are varieties of this germ. In 1892 in a paper read before the Association of American Physicians, and published in the transactions of that Society, I made the following statement: "It probably makes but little difference whether we conclude that these germs are varieties of one species or that they are related species. I know of no hard and fast lines upon which one can decide, to the satisfaction of everyone else, whether two or more

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