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Article
April 19, 1902

AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE HISTORY OF YELLOW FEVER AND ITS TRANSMISSION BY THE CULEX MOSQUITO (STEGOMYIA OF THEOBALD).

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(16):993-996. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480160015001b
Abstract

The early history of yellow fever, notwithstanding the scarcity and vagueness of the data referring to the first 150 years after the discovery of America, enables us to establish a very plausible connection between the earliest undoubted epidemics of yellow fever, described by Du Tertre and by Cogolludo in the fourth decade of the seventeenth century, and the previous ones which, under the names of "plague," "pestilence" and "malignant fevers," usually attacked the newly-arrived Spaniards at Santo Domingo, Terra Firma and Vera Cruz, ever since the conquest of Mexico in 1519, as also between those same fevers and the "modorra-illness" or "pestilential modorra" which had been recorded, under similar circumstances, at Santo Domingo and at Darien, during the first twenty-five years after the discovery.1 If this connection be accepted, the unavoidable inference must be that, since the American Indians have no natural immunity against yellow fever and that disease

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