[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 17, 1902

A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE TRANSMISSION OF PATHOGENIC GERMS BY THE COMMON HOUSE-FLY.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(20):1291-1294. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480200005001a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

William Hamilton Gibson, the naturalist and artist, called attention to a troublesome parasite of the housefly, the microscopic, red, false scorpion. A careful scrutiny of a sheet of adhesive fly-paper in use will show many victims of this inconvenient little handicap, which, once anchored to the fly's leg, remains there, an animated and persistent tag.

A more serious and fatal enemy is the fly fungus, which "silences more house-flies than all the traps and poisons devoted to their extermination." This germ-scourge of flies kills them swiftly, and continues to grow with such rapidity that it perforates the body of its host and spreads around him on the wall or window-glass a white shroud of mold, from which spores are wafted, to the peril of next year's flies. That the housefly acts as host to this fungus is apparent to any one who will examine with a hand lens one of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×