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Article
May 31, 1902

THE VALUE OF STATE CONTROL AND VACCINATION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SMALLPOX.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(22):1434-1435. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480220020001g
Abstract

Vaccination became so popular and universal in all civilized countries in the decades following its introduction that the horrors of smallpox almost faded from the memory of men, and medical writers and teachers habitually wrote and spoke of it as possessing only an historic interest. It is probable that in this age vaccination became so general that more or less inherited immunity existed, as a rule, even where the individual himself had not been subjected to the operation. Then came the reaction against it, and an exaggeration and misrepresentation of the accidents and evils incident to any like remedy used by the laity, as well as by many careless medical men, who had no conception of the value of cleanliness, which philosophic minds should have anticipated. In this the anti-vaccinationist had his day, alongside of him who doubted if Shakespeare wrote his own plays, and the other countless freaks, literary

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