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Article
October 15, 1898

NOTES ON TYPHOID FEVER.TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE CASES TREATED DURING AN EPIDEMIC OF THAT DISEASE.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(16):904-906. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450160023002e
Abstract

Typhoid fever remains a most interesting study. Its pathology, which was supposed to have been settled years ago by the discovery of the bacillus of Eberth, will have to be remodeled to fit certain facts of recent research. The bacteriologist, who has done so much to illuminate this disease, can not yet call his labors finished. The best efforts of the therapist to evolve a treatment which will abort, or even materially modify, the course of the disease have signally failed. The clinician must often confess his shortcomings in its diagnosis.

An epidemic of this disease began in the city of Minneapolis in February, 1897, and was traceable directly to the water-supply. Drs. Westbrook and Wilson, 1 of the laboratory of the State Board of Health, isolated the bacillus typhosus from the water in April of that year. Nearly every case seen during the months of March, April and May

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