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Article
October 29, 1898

IS THE USE OF THE TERM "TYPHOID PNEUMONIA" JUSTIFIABLE? A CASE IN POINT.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(18):1030-1032. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450180024001i

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Abstract

The title of this paper was suggested by the following case, the postmortem findings of which made the original diagnosis recorded incorrect:

The child was a robust girl, 13 years of age; seen first on Jan. 30, 1898, she having had a chill on the two previous days, with a maximum temperature on the first day of 101½ degrees and on the second day 103½. From this time to the eleventh day, all of the symptoms were those of typhoid fever, and the diagnosis was so recorded. There had been a general malaise for several days before the first chill; the headache was quite severe, gradually improving as the second week approached; the tongue was heavily coated a brownish yellow, with red edges and tip, but was moist; slight abdominal tenderness at first low down and a little to the left of the median line, right sided tenderness with gurgling

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