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Article
November 5, 1898

A FURTHER CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF THE DIFFICULTIES OF DEFECATION IN INFANTS.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(19):1091-1092. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450190015002e
Abstract

At last year's meeting of this Section I offered for inspection a score of dried specimens of the infant's lower intestine as evidence that the infant strains at stool because of the imperfect development of the anatomic features concerned in the mechanism of defecation. Examination of those specimens revealed the fact that the wall of the infant rectum and sigmoid flexure is thin, compared to that of the adult. It was impossible to distinguish the longitudinal muscular bands which are so apparent in the gut of the adult. It was observed that in the fresh state the mucous membrane constitutes a greater part of the gutwall of the infant, and that the mucous membrane and muscular coats are more intimately adherent than in the adult. The infant gut being very deficient in muscular elements, the intrinsic power of peristalsis can not be present in that degree necessary to it as

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