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Article
November 12, 1898

RECENT EXPERIENCES IN MILITARY SURGERY AFTER THE BATTLE OF SANTIAGO.On Board the Hospital Ship ''Relief," July 22, 1898.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(20):1164-1171. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450200032001n

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Abstract

Military surgery is no more nor less than emergency surgery in civil practice. The surgeon in daily practice has learned long ago that every accidental wound must practically be regarded and treated as an infected wound. In this respect the military surgeon of today has the advantage over his colleague in civil practice in knowing that the small caliber bullet inflicts wounds which per se are more often aseptic than septic. Our recent experience in Cuba has shown that the small jacketed bullet seldom carries with it into the tissues clothing or any other infectious substances. Most of the wounds of the soft tissues, uncomplicated by visceral lesions, which in themselves would become a source of infection, healed by primary intention in a remarkably short time. If infection followed it usually did so in the superficial portion of the wound in connection with the skin, and what is more than

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