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November 19, 1898

RECENT EXPERIENCES IN MILITARY SURGERY AFTER THE BATTLE OF SANTIAGO.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(21):1239-1242. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450210040002n

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Abstract

Case 18.  —Scanlon, Company K, Third Cavalry, was wounded on the second day of the battle of Santiago. The ball entered the chest through the third rib midclavicular line on the right side, passed downward and backward and escaped in the gluteal region on the same side, after perforating the ilium (Fig. 21). The ball must have passed through the lung, diaphragm and liver. Hemoptysis slight, but distressing nausea, vomiting and pain. Admitted to the hospital ship Relief July 15. At that time he had a constant temperature ranging between 100 and 102 degrees F., vomiting, diarrhea and rapid emaciation. Great pain over the liver and ascending colon. Hemothorax and marked swelling in the region of the liver and abdominal cavity on the right side. Examination of urine negative. Owing to the great debility and pronounced anemia it was not deemed advisable to resort to laparotomy.

Case 19.  —Harry Mitchell,

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