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April 22, 1899

ONE-SIDED AMBLYOPIA.ITS DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE WHEN WITHOUT OPHTHALMOSCOPIC LESIONS.

JAMA. 1899;XXXII(16):855-859. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450430009001b
Abstract

It is often a difficult problem to determine the cause of a one-sided reduction of sight not dependent upon intraocular disease.

In order to illustrate these difficulties, I wish to present the histories of some obscure cases and view them in the light of more decisive observations in my experience. The first inquiry in such cases must be whether the dimness observed by the patient is really a recent or progressive failure of sight and not a stationary old amblyopia, as is often found in strabismic eyes or less often in the more ametropic eye of inanisometropia, even if no squint exists. Not uncommonly a patient does not know that one eye is inferior to the other until tested by the oculist. On the other hand, I can recall at least one instance where a young man became alarmed because he had recently learned by shutting one eye that his

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