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Article
May 13, 1899

SOME REFLECTIONS UPON CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE IN THE PHILADELPHIA POLYCLINIC; PHYSICIAN TO THE PHILADELPHIA HOSPITAL, ETC. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1899;XXXII(19):1028-1030. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450460012001e
Abstract

Modern research and investigation have shed much light on the intimate nature of disease processes, but there is a good deal of virgin soil yet to be tilled. Life may be looked upon as a manifestation of the activity of the cell (or of an aggregation of cells), which, if expended in a proper manner, represents the condition of health. Perversion of this activity, through influences acting from either within or without, leads to disease; while permanent inhibition (destruction) results in death. Normal cellular activity (function) implies a proper relation between waste (catabolism) and repair (anabolism), the replacement of used-up and worn-out material by fresh nutritive pabulum, together with the elimination of the products of disintegration—normal metabolic or nutritional equilibrium. Failure in either of these processes, as well as defect in quality of the nutritive pabulum, gives rise to derangement of this metabolic equilibrium, resulting in the one instance in

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