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Article
June 10, 1899

MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CRIME.ORATION ON STATE MEDICINE BEFORE THE FIFTIETH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. COLUMBUS, OHIO, JUNE 6-9, 1899.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Rush Medical College; Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System, Post-Graduate Medical School; Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System and Clinic Medicine, Northwestern University Woman's Medical School, etc. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1899;XXXII(23):1282-1287. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450500006002a
Abstract

The limitation and treatment of crime is one of the great questions of the day. The closing hours of the nineteenth century are full of wonders. The progress in science, in literature and in art has been marvelous. Medicine and surgery have made mighty strides. The insane, the feeble-minded, the deaf, dumb and blind have received in these later years treatment that is scientific and successful. The care of the criminal is the one great question that baffles society, and great difficulties have arisen from the fact that the medical aspects of crime have not been sufficiently considered. Criminology of to-day is much in the same condition that psychiatry was when Pinel and Tuke appeared and wrought their memorable reforms, substituting patience and scientific treatment for brutality and chains. This transformation in the care of the insane was brought about by the medical profession, and it is our duty to-day

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