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Article
August 26, 1899

IS THE BIRTH-RATE IN THE UNITED STATES DECREASING?

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(9):554. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.02450610056016
Abstract

What may serve as food for proper thought, especially for its bearing on the subject of overpopulation in the United States, is that of the birth-rate throughout the land. Aside from its medical status, this question is one which may engage the sober thoughts of wiser heads who come to deal with political economy as it applies to our country. In proving the subject of the birth-rate we have to fall back on that notorious factor of inaccuracy known as "statistics." In a recent editorial in one of our daily papers1, a writer endeavors to prove that the birth-rate in the United States is gradually decreasing. This statement is backed by the statistics as obtained from the records of H. T. Newcomb, a statistician in the agricultural department at Washington. First of all it is believed that the population of the United States—not including colonies—in the year 1900 will

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