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September 2, 1899

TYPHOID FEVER.A QUARTER OF A CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE THEREWITH, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SOME UNSOLVED PROBLEMS.

Author Affiliations

WHEELERSBURG, OHIO.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(10):577-580. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450620015001d
Abstract

The territory in which I have been located continuously for a quarter of a century is in the Ohio River valley—a region of low hills and valleys, with excellent natural drainage and exceptional freedom from swamps and sloughs, with a permeable soil, an abundant watersupply, furnished mainly by wells and springs, and occupied by a farming population of more than ordinary thrift, intelligence and sobriety. During nearly all of this period I have had more or less cases of typhoid fever to treat, and thus have had opportunities to observe the disease under circumstances quite different from those presented in hospital practice, or surrounding the busy practitioner in large cities.

Speaking generally, I may say that the type of the disease which has prevailed here has been mild, with a tendency to assume endemic conditions. The whole region was formerly intensely malarial, but in conformity with what has been observed

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