[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 2, 1899

MEDICINE.ITS PROGRESS, PROBLEMS, AND PROSPECTS.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON TO MERCER HOSPITAL. TRENTON, N.J.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(10):588-591. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450620026001h
Abstract

In the future, the various internal organs may prove to be luxuries rather than necessities. Ribs, the sternum, and portions of the chest wall are now resected with impunity. Tumors of the spine, and in fact all tumors, are now far more amenable to treatment than formerly. The advance in plastic surgery has been very great. Senn's method of making intestinal anastomosis has greatly advanced abdominal surgery, and we now remove portions of the intestine that are injured or diseased. In cancer of the rectum, large portions have been resected—in some cases as much as twelve inches—with a mortality of 20 per cent., and permanent cures in one-third of the cases. Dr. Guiseppe Ruggi reports the "successful resection of ten feet and nine inches of the small intestine of a small boy," 8 years of age. In five weeks the child was perfectly well. Dr. Dressman, in thirty or more

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×