[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.98.97. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 7, 1899

EMERGENCY SURGERY, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO WORK IN HOMES OF THE POOR.

Author Affiliations

EYOTA, MINN.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(15):895-896. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450670016002e
Abstract

We have all heard the remark, and perhaps made it ourselves: "If we had the case in a hospital we would have operated, but could do nothing under the existing circumstances." The marvelously rapid improvement in hospitals and hospital equipments has made it possible to do a class of surgery that would be all but impossible in private houses, especially in those of the poor with small and perhaps dirty rooms. But, if we accept the responsibility of the care of the poor at all, it is our duty to do the very best for them that circumstances permit.

Schiemelbusch and many others have shown that wound infection is caused by direct contact, and that we have little to fear from the air, unless large quantities of dust are flying. If, then, we carry with us, as we can, in a not very large satchel, previously-sterilized towels, sponge, pads, dressings,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×