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Article
November 25, 1899

CONTINUOUS SALINE IRRIGATION FOR GENERAL SEPTIC PERITONITIS.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(22):1366-1367. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.02450740054013
Abstract

The outlook in cases of general peritonitis from whatever cause has in the past been exceedingly gloomy, to state the prognosis mildly. A recent experience, however, would tend to show that with intelligent treatment at the hands of a bold surgeon, the result is not necessarily fatal. At a recent meeting of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, Dr. Ernest Laplace2 reported the case of a woman suffering from general septic peritonitis, secondary to appendicitis, in which, after the abdomen was opened, adhesions freed, lymph-exudation removed, the appendix resected, through-and-through irrigation of the peritoneal cavity was established, and continued steadily for seventy-two hours, at the rate of ten pints of normal salt solution at a temperature of 100 F., every fifteen minutes, making a total of 360 gallons. The patient recovered. This case seems sufficiently noteworthy to be deserving of more than passing notice. It may be contended that the

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