[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 25, 1899

POPULAR LACK OF APPRECIATION OF MEDICAL HEROISM.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(22):1367. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.02450740055015
Abstract

In the recent mortality reports of medical officers of the Government, we read that Dr. W. R. McAdam1, assistant-surgeon, M.-H. S., died October 12 at Key West, from yellow fever. This and many similar instances prompt the question: What proportion of the general public knows anything of the meaning of this announcement? Or even knows when these sacrifices occur? The lot of the medical hero is surely not to be laurel-crowned in this world. The medical officer of the United States may die at his post, manfully doing his duty, and usually sacrificing himself to protect his country from the inroads of dangerous epidemic disease, and the public passes heedlessly along attending to its business, but is ever ready to lavish praise on the hero of martial deeds. It was ever thus, and will probably so continue. To not a little degree the profession has itself to blame for

×