[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 23, 1899

THE PROGRESS OF MEDICAL EDUCATION—A SUGGESTION FOR A BETTER ARRANGEMENT OF THE MEDICAL CURRICULUM.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(26):1569-1571. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450780001001
Abstract

In looking back over the progress of medical education in the United States during the past fifteen years, the profession can congratulate itself on a steady, and even remarkable development. In 1881 there were in the United States 25 students of medicine, 6 of law and 9 of theology to each 100, 000 inhabitants. The students of theology were maintained and educated by private endowments, amounting to over $20, 000, 000, those of law paid for their own education in fees, while the students of medicine paid only trifling fees, and were educated for the most part at the expense of the medical profession. Since 1881 the medical students in the United States have increased in a remarkable ratio, from 13, 000 to 24, 000, and are still educated at the expense of their educators. The fees in the majority of schools have been inadequate to pay the incidental expenses and the instructors, and the total

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×