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Article
December 30, 1899

SPLENIC ANEMIA, OR "BANTI'S DISEASE," COMPLICATED BY DIABETES MELLITUS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THERAPEUTICS, JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(27):1641. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450790005001a
Abstract

In the Medical News of March 27, 1897, I reported several cases illustrating grave changes in the blood. One of these, it will be recalled, was a man aged 24 years, who had a negative family history and a personal history that he had had double pneumonia in 1894, and in the same year had fallen a distance of thirty feet while working in a mine, sustaining as a result of this fall severe injury to his head and neck. He was admitted to the Jefferson Hospital in 1895, with the statement that in July of that year he had begun to suffer from severe pain beneath the clavicle of the left side, this extending downward into the left hypochondria1. He was exceedingly pale, his conjunctivæ yellow, and the spleen enormously large. The urine was entirely normal. Later on, an examination of his eyes, by Professor de Schweinitz, revealed

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