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Article
February 3, 1900

A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF THE THEORY OF THE INOCULATION OF MALARIAL FEVER THROUGH THE AGENCY OF MOSQUITOES.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(5):265-269. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610050011002b
Abstract

The inoculation theory of malarial fever through the agency of mosquitoes is not a new one. It is said to have been mentioned by Roman writers about the time of the Christian era. Linne1 and Sir Henry Holland viewed the transmission of malarial fever through the bite of the mosquito favorably. In 1807 Crawford1 published a paper on "the Mosquital Origin of Malarial Fever," and King2, in 1883, one on the same subject. It, however, remained for Patrick Manson to lay the foundation on which Ronald Ross has raised the superstructure of so many facts in connection with this important question. Battista Grassi probably formulated the axiom, laddove c'é malaria ci sono zanzave—where there is malaria, there are mosquitoes. Manson, after a long series of deductions, finally arrived at the conclusion that the mosquito acted as the intermediary host in the propagation of the malarial parasite,

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