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Article
February 10, 1900

STRANGULATED HERNIA: SOME PRACTICAL REMARKS CONCERNING ITS DIAGNOSIS AND ITS PROPER MANAGEMENT.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(6):319-321. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610060001001
Abstract

Strangulated hernia presents too important a subject to be comprehensively set forth in a brief essay, therefore the scope of this paper has been limited to the entirely practical and clinical features. No attempt has been made to minutely describe the pathic anatomy of the condition, nor to review the theories of the etiology of strangulation of a hernia. Broad rules have been treated as being invariable; the exceptions have not been dwelt on.

An incarcerated hernia is one in which the contents of the bowel involved are so included as to prevent their passage or escape, but in which the blood circulation is not materially impeded.

A strangulated hernia, on the other hand, is one in which the constriction is sufficient to shut off the blood circulation of the part involved. For the practical purposes of this paper it may be stated that strangulation of a hernia depends on

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