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Article
March 3, 1900

URETERAL CALCULUS.ITS DIAGNOSIS BY MEANS OF THE WAX-TIPPED BOUGIE. ESCAPE OF THE CALCULUS PER VIAS NATURALES AFTER FORCIBLE DILATATION OF THE URETERAL ORIFICE.

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(9):515-517. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610090001001

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Abstract

On January 31, of this year, I was called by Dr. L. Hamburger to see a woman in extreme pain from renal colic. I found a well-nourished patient about 38 years old, suffering from a pain beginning in the left kidney and extending down the left ureter to its vesical orifice, where the distress seemed to be centered.

The attack had begun a week before, after some unusual exertion in caring for an aged relative, and was marked by frequent urination and some hematuria at intervals. At no time did she pass any debris or crystalline elements suggestive of calculus.

The abdominal examination revealed no point of tenderness or enlargement other than the very fat walls. By the vaginal touch I found a normal right ureter, but on the left side the ureter was exquisitely tender and there was a distinct, firm enlargement about half way between the internal urethral

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