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Article
March 10, 1900

SOME POINTS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TRAUMATIC INJURIES OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.

Author Affiliations

Neurologist to the St. Luke's Hospital; Consultant Alienist and Neurologist to the Arapahoe County Hospital; Neurologist, U. P. R'y Co. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(10):579-584. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610100001001
Abstract

In as brief a space as possible I shall endeavor to consider some differential points in the diagnosis of various affections of the central nervous system, laying especial stress on such as result from traumatism. I shall include in these the psychic effects of shock and suggestion.

The first point to which to call attention is found in a short paper written by me and read by title, as I was not present, at the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Railway Surgeons, held at Chicago, in October, 1897. In this I pointed out that damages were occasionally recovered from corporations for the effects of disease that had existed many years before the occurrence of the accident in which the plaintiff testified, under oath, he had received the injuries for which he was claiming damages1. In the first case, a brief abstract of which occurs in the paper

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