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Article
March 31, 1900

OBSERVATIONS IN LARYNGOTOMY; TRACHEOTOMY; INTUBATIONS; BASED ON CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery and Applied Anatomy, Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons; Surgeon to St. Alexis and Cleveland General Hospitals. CLEVELAND, OHIO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(13):778-781. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610130010001b

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Abstract

The animals were all reduced to full surgical anesthesia by ether before the experiments were begun, and were killed before recovery therefrom. Respiratory tracings were obtained by means of a rubber tambour, attached to a canvas band, encirling three-fourths of the circumference of the animal's chest. This energized a writing style attached to an organ-key mechanism. Respiratory tracings were obtained very accurately. Blood-pressure was recorded by means of a mercury manometer. The drums were revolved by a mechanism so made as to be capable of a variety of movements, ranging from one revolution in thirty minutes to eighteen per minute, so that any phase of any given tracing might be duly recorded. The following is a part of a rather extended research, which enabled us to estimate the reliable reduction with comparatively few experiments.

Surgeons have not infrequently encountered, in performing a laryngotomy, sudden collapse at the moment when the

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