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Article
March 31, 1900

SHOULDER-HUMERO-SCAPULA ARTICULATION.SOME OF THE COMPLICATIONS AND SEQUELAE ATTENDING OR FOLLOWING REDUCIBLE OR IRREDUCIBLE DISLOCATIONS, WITH A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE VARIOUS MODERN OPERATIVE MEASURES NOW EMPLOYED FOR THEIR TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

Visiting Surgeon to the Harlem Hospital; Professor of Surgery in the New York School of Clinical Medicine. NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(13):797-800. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610130029001j

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Abstract

THE ROENTGEN RAY AND POSITIVE DIAGNOSIS IN HUMEROSCAPULA DISLOCATIONS OR FRACTURE-DISLOCATIONS.  The place of the skiagraph in the diagnosis of various complex or obscure shoulder traumatisms, especially those involving the humero-scapula joint, we would suppose by this time would be determined.If those shadow pictures could only always be relied on, a vast and definite advance would have been made; the outlines depicted on the camera would at once, in many cases, determine the futility of attempting reduction by the ordinary means.Simultaneous fracture of the greater tuberosity, the outer head of the humerus, sometimes complicates humero-scapula luxation. Stimson says it can not always be detected; fracture through the base of the glenoid fossa, with detachment or clipping off its superior or inferior surface; a fracture through the anatomic neck, or the acromian process above may complicate this luxation, and often can not be detected by manipulation or other outward

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