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Article
April 7, 1900

NITROGENOUS ELIMINATION AND DIAPHORESIS IN CONNECTION WITH DISEASES OF THE KIDNEYS.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(14):883. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460140055016
Abstract

The utility of sweating in the treatment of chronic parenchymatous nephritis has not been admitted by all clinicians. In fact, there are some who consider diaphoresis unnecessary in this connection, and under some conditions not unattended with danger. It is suggested that in the process of sweating considerable water, but relatively little nitrogenous matter, is eliminated through the skin. In this way, it is thought, there results an increased concentration of the blood, which disappears in the course of a few hours. In the course of this readjustment nitrogenous fluid is taken up from the tissues by the blood, and this may be a source of danger when nitrogenous elimination is deficient. Clinical experience, however, is not always in consonance with this view. Although uremic attacks have been observed immediately after forced sweating, their occurrence is not the rule and the widespread employment of this procedure would seem to indicate

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