[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 19, 1900

ARGUMENT AGAINST SENATE BILL 34, FIFTY-SIXTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION, GENERALLY KNOWN AS THE "ANTIVIVISECTION BILL."

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. RALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(20):1242-1244. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610200028001i

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

On February 21, 1900, the Senate Committee on the District of Columbia, with Senator Gallinger in the chair, gave to advocates and opponents of the "antivivisection bill" a public hearing, at which I presented in its main features the following argument. After this hearing, on March 9, 1900, an amended or substitute bill, still designated S. Bill 34, was printed for the committee. The principal changes from the original bill made by this substitute are as follows: 1. The title now reads: "A bill for the regulation of vivisection in the District of Columbia." 2. The restrictions apply for the most part only to experiments on warm-blooded animals instead of to those on all vertebrates. 3. Experiments to acquire "surgical experience" are now allowed. 4. The class of officers of the United States Government who may experiment without a license from the District Commissioners is defined. 5. The use of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×