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Article
June 2, 1900

INTRALARYNGEAL INSUFFLATION.FOR THE RELIEF OF ACUTE SURGICAL PNEUMOTHORAX. ITS HISTORY AND METHODS WITH A DESCRIPTION OF THE LATEST DEVICES FOR THIS PURPOSE.

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS, LA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(22):1371-1375. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610220001001
Abstract

In man, as in the lower animals, the sudden admission of air in the normal pleura, whether this occurs accidentally or as the result of deliberate purpose in the course of operative interventions in the thorax, is a condition always fraught with much danger to the patient and anxiety to the operator.

It is not a small, accidental puncture or aperture communicating with the pleural cavity, permitting the gradual entrance of air and the production of a partial pneumothorax, that is feared, but it is the large openings which allow the rapid and free entrance of air, and that are followed almost invariably by collapse of the lungs, cyanosis and evidences of defective oxygenation and arrested respiration, that have led the surgeons of all times to dread the production of traumatism or surgical pneumothorax as one of the greatest evils in intrathoracic surgery.

The evidence on this subject is so

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