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Article
June 2, 1900

REGULATION OF THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.

Author Affiliations

DEAN OF HIGHLAND PARK COLLEGE OF LAW. DES MOINES, IOWA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(22):1395-1400. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610220025001f
Abstract

The power and the duty of the states to regulate the practice of medicine have been fully established. It is the inalienable right and imperative duty of the government, by legislation, to promote the health, morals, education and good order of the people. This right, vested in the people in their sovereign capacity, has been likened to the individual right of self-defense, the exercise of which is a part of the law of self-preservation. The police is a plenary power, and may be exercised by the state to regulate or prohibit things inconsistent with the public welfare.

No other function of government has been so frequently appealed to, nor so successfully exercised, and none other is of greater importance to the people, individually and collectively. We look to this power for the suppression and punishment of crime, the preservation of public peace, the regulation of dangerous employments, the sale and

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