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Article
June 23, 1900

THE HANDWRITING ON THE WALL: WHAT DOES IT PORTRAY?

Author Affiliations

FELLOW OF THE CHICAGO ACADEMY OF MEDICINE CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(25):1597-1599. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610250009003a
Abstract

The founders of American dentistry had high professional ideals. The methods of practice at their command were the most crude and almost if not wholly mechanical. They deemed the specialty a part of the healing art and hence a department of the science of medicine. Such profound regard had early practitioners of dentistry for their calling that in almost every instance before or after they had begun practice they took up the study of general medicine. They were capable of practicing and did practice general medicine. The illustrious Haydon, Jeffries and many others were graduates of the best American and foreign medical colleges. Later, from 1810 to 1840—the latter date being that of the establishment of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery—a long list of medically educated men gave honor and dignity to their special calling. These men were the peers of any in the practice of medicine. I doubt

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