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June 23, 1900

VENOCAVERNOUS ANGIOMA.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery at the Kansas City Medical College, Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery at the Women's Medical College, and Surgeon to the German Hospital. KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(25):1615-1616. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610250027003k
Abstract

The following extraordinary case I shall call venocavernous angioma, for want of a better name and for descriptive purposes. The patient was first seen by me about March 1, and continued under my observation until the operation was performed, the data being as follows:

Mr. H., 48 years of age, born and raised in Virginia, gave a family history that was negative. Within a few months after his birth it was noticed that his right arm was not like his left, in appearance, but little was thought of it until he was about 4 years of age, when there was marked discoloration along the course of its superficial veins. This discoloration, of bluish appearance, continued to increase very slowly, although it gave him little or no trouble for several years. He was subjected to all kinds of labor incidental to farming, which he continued to perform with increasing difficulty until

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