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Article
June 23, 1900

ETIOLOGY OF GENERAL PARALYSIS OF THE INSANE.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(25):1634-1635. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460250046009
Abstract

Whether or not progressive paralysis of the insane and locomotor ataxia represent different localizations of the same disease is a debatable question. They have a number of points in common, and are not rarely associated. Both are more common in males than in females, in the city than in the country and in mature life than at any other period, result from syphilis more than from any other causative condition, and are not amenable to radical treatment. Some aspects of the etiology of progressive paralysis of the insane are discussed in a recent communication by Krafft-Ebing,1 who characterizes this affection as one of the diseases evolved by nineteenth century civilization. Almost entirely unknown one hundred years ago, the number of cases has increased at a rapid rate nearly everywhere, as shown in part by the fact that the proportion of cases admitted to hospitals for the insane is greater

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