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Article
February 1, 1965

Computer Program Simplifies Record Keeping at Hospital: Investigators find that hospital reports can be adapted to computer manipulation without requiring the physician to alter his clinical reporting routine.

JAMA. 1965;191(5):36-37. doi:10.1001/jama.1965.03080050084048

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Abstract

When computers are adapted to hospital record keeping, changes in the reporting procedures of physicians must be made to accommodate the capabilities of the machine. These changes often meet with resistance by physicians accustomed to the freedom of conventional clinical reporting methods.

In a pilot study at Johns Hopkins Medical School, two investigators are seeking to determine the extent to which hospital reports can be adapted to computer manipulation without requiring the physician to alter substantially his clinical routine.

For their study, Robert H. Drachman, MD, assistant professor, microbiology and pediatrics, and Allan H. Levy, MD, assistant professor, microbiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, have chosen the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Johns Hopkins Hospital, where several thousand patients are examined each month.

"The project was set up to collect information on patients seen in the pediatric dispensary where we have, in common with any large hospital, a

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