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Article
June 7, 1890

THE MEDICO-LEGAL RELATIONS OF PARALYSIS FROM BRAIN DISEASE.Read before the Section on Medical Jurisprudence at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Nashville, Tenn., May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM, DIDACTIC AND CLINICAL, IN THE WOMAN'S MEDICAL COLLEGE; PROFESSOR OF MENTAL DISEASES AND LECTURER ON THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(23):825-826. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410230017002c

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Abstract

Hemiplegia, be it complete or partial, is a frequent and important result of brain disease. Any cause that sufficiently disturbs the nutrition of the psycho-motor centres of the brain, or the motor tracts below these centres, will produce this condition. The severe forms of cerebral congestion, cerebral hæmorrhage, cerebral embolism, cerebral thrombosis, cerebral abscess, cerebral tumor, may be enumerated as pathological conditions producing this paralysis. In the case of hemiplegia following cerebral congestion the duration of the pathological condition is short, and the resulting mental disturbance is slight and not usually of long duration. The extent of the paralysis, its duration, and the resultant mental disturbance depend upon the situation and extent of the pathological lesion. They all produce more or less mental disturbance, such as irritability of the emotions, irresolution of purpose, failure of memory, and interfere with the power of converting words into ideas. The tracts in the

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