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Article
June 21, 1890

SOME PROMINENT FEATURES COMMON TO DRUNKENNESS AND GENERAL PARALYSIS OF THE INSANE.Read in the Section of Medical Jurisprudence, at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Nashville, May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

OF BELLEFONTAINE, O. MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF INEBRIETY; ONE OF THE VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON INEBRIETY, LONDON, 1887; ETC.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(25):884-887. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410250004001a
Abstract

Alienists long ago pointed out the remarkable similarity that exists between certain prominent features of drunkenness and those of paresis. And this resemblance between the appearances and symptoms of the two affections is not surprising when it is remembered that a certain grade of universal paralysis is an essential condition in both of them.

While it is true that there is a striking sameness in the superficial features of paresis and drunkenness, there are, nevertheless, certain facts which impress an individuality upon each, and which may serve, upon occasion, to distinguish one from the other.

For instance, in drunkenness there are particular chemical affinities belonging to alcohol, which tend to produce physical changes in the structure, that are unknown in paresis. Such changes are perceived in the appearance of the blood globules, and in the disturbance of their functions when they are influenced by the presence of alcohol in the

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