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Article
July 30, 1892

TRANSMISSION AND BEHAVIOR OF TYPHOID POISON AS OBSERVED IN COUNTRY PRACTICE.

Author Affiliations

OF FARMLAND, INDIANA.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(5):119-122. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420050001001
Abstract

By a vast majority of the observers who would seem best calculated to know the facts, typhoid fever is now thought to be due to the invasion of the blood by a specific microörganism, known as the germ of Eberth, or the bacillus typhosus. The same observers believe that water is the principal, in fact, almost the only, medium that operates in the transmission of this infectious germ from its focus development, outside of the human body, to the subject of enteric fever. The germs or their spores are said to be eliminated from the typhoid patient, with the alvine discharges in a totally passive state. They increase rapidly in number and soon develop virulence and activity, under the favorable conditions afforded by filth, heat and moisture.

Water is supposed to be a favorable habitat for typhoid germs1. These microbes may find ready access to the surface water by a

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