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Article
July 30, 1892

THE NECESSITY AND BEST METHODS OF REGULATING THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.Read before the American Academy of Medicine, at Detroit, Mich., June 6, 1892.

Author Affiliations

HONORARY MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF MEDICINE, DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY AND MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(5):134-141. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420050016001g

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Abstract

Gentlemen: In reviewing the question of medical education in the United States the student of history will readily conclude that the facilities afforded pupils of medicine have been painfully inadequate, and that the minimum of requirements in a vast majority of colleges have been well below that standard which affords the public a profession possessing a degree of skill and ability commensurate with the safety of its people. It has been the policy of the authorities controlling these institutions of learning to maintain a standard below recognized safety. In addition to the very low curriculum, the resources of most colleges have been inadequate, and the clinical instruction most deficient. It is but recently that a majority of the colleges in this country have attempted a system of regular laboratory instruction. A study of the causes leading to this dilemma are many; among the most frequent may be mentioned the following:

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