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Article
September 3, 1892

INFANTILE CATARACT.Read in the Section of Ophthalmology, at the Forty-third Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Detroit, Mich., June, 1892.

Author Affiliations

OF CLEVELAND. O. PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE EYE, EAR AND THROAT, IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF WOOSTER UNIVERSITY; OCULIST AND AURIST TO THE CITY WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S AND UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(10):278-280. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420100010001b
Abstract

I selected this subject, not because I had any new facts to communicate or new operations to propose, or new theories to advance; but because my experience, observation and reading has led me to believe that, as a rule, we do not treat infantile cataract as successfully and as intelligently as we do many other eye diseases. If I am correct in this supposition, an interchange of ideas on this important subject at this time cannot fail to be of value.

I know of no subject more perplexing to the medical student than the classification of cataracts; they have been classified as to age as congenital, infantile, juvenile and senile, as to consistency as fluid, soft, mixed and hard. They may be capsular or lenticular. Capsular cataracts may be pyramidal anterior polar, posterior polars, or degenerative. Lenticular cataracts may be nuclear, cortical or zonular. Cataracts have been classified as to

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