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December 17, 1892

PURULENT BRAIN DEPOSITS, AND PHLEBITIS AND THROMBOSIS OF THE CEREBRAL VEINS AND SINUSES FOLLOWING EAR DISEASE.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(25):725-728. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420250019001g

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Abstract

(Continued from page 691.)

Brain abscesses are never a primary disease. They are always the result of traumatismi, pus contact, or pus migration, and are usually caused from otorrhœa. They affect the white rather than the gray matter, and being usually found in the temporal lobe —in which are neither motor or sensory nerve-tracts —distinct localization symptoms are apt to be conspicuous from their abscence. This is equally true of abscesses in the frontal lobe, which may be entirely destroyed, without producing special signs.

Mr. Field says that "The more acute forms of abscess, give rise to the signs usually attributed to meningitis or encephalitis, while the more chronic ones give rise to no symptoms whatever, until the abscess extends sufficiently near the surface of the brain to light up an inflammation of the membranes, when it becomes suddenly revealed. The probability is that chronic abscesses may exist for years

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