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Article
December 24, 1892

OUGHT INFANTS TO BE WASHED DIRECTLY AFTER BIRTH?Read in the Section of Diseases of Children, at the Forty-third Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Detroit, Mich.. June. 1892.

Author Affiliations

OF NORTHAMPTON, MASS. LECTURER ON DISEASES OF CHILDREN IN THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, BOSTON, MASS.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(26):739-740. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420260005001b

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Abstract

Doubtless most physicians find themselves confronted by this question nearly every week.

The dire results in some instances, where infants have been subjected to severe exposure to cold, during a prolonged process of this part of their toilet, would perhaps lead one to think a negative answer should be given. On the other hand, there are cases that have seemingly received the same treatment, and come out unscathed by any disease the etiology of which is credited to undue exposure to chilling influences.

There is, probably, no hygienic measure more tempting to a good nurse, than to arrange the toilet of the little one, making its body sweet and clean, as early as possible after birth.

If, as the custom is, we look to nature, as manifested in the lower animals, for a solution of this problem, we find that all the domestic, and so far as we are able

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