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JAMA Classics
October 1, 2008

Closed-Chest Cardiac Massage: Progress Measured by the Exceptions

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (Dr Weisfeldt); and Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (Dr Ornato).

Author Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (Dr Weisfeldt); and Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (Dr Ornato).

JAMA. 2008;300(13):1582-1584. doi:10.1001/jama.300.13.1582
Abstract

Cardiac resuscitation after cardiac arrest or ventricular fibrillation has been limited by the need for open thoracotomy and direct cardiac massage. As a result of exhaustive animal experimentation a method of external transthoracic cardiac massage has been developed. Immediate resuscitative measures can now be initiated to give not only mouth-to-nose artificial respiration but also adequate cardiac massage without thoracotomy. The use of this technique on 20 patients has given an over-all permanent survival rate of 70%. Anyone, anywhere, can now initiate cardiac resuscitative procedures. All that is needed are two hands.

See PDF for full text of the original JAMA article.

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