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Medicine and the Media
July 17, 2002

Commercial Filming of Patient Care Activities in Hospitals

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department, Department of Emergency Medicine and the Cedars-Sinai Center for Health Care Ethics, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif (Dr Geiderman); and Department of Surgery/Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas (Dr Larkin).

 

Medicine and the Media Section Editor: Annette Flanagin, RN, MA, Managing Senior Editor.

JAMA. 2002;288(3):373-379. doi:10.1001/jama.288.3.373
Abstract

Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

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