Bisphosphonate Prescriptions in Men With Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use | Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology | JAMA | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
December 3, 2014

Bisphosphonate Prescriptions in Men With Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 3Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
JAMA. 2014;312(21):2285-2286. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.14038

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective, widely used therapy for men with prostate cancer. Adverse effects include bone loss and increased fracture risk.1 Canadian guidelines recommended bisphosphonate use in men with osteoporosis or fragility fracture as early as 2002 and in men on ADT in 2006.2,3

Rates of bone mineral density testing in men starting ADT were previously examined4; however, bisphosphonate prescribing patterns are relatively unknown and have likely changed over time because of increasing awareness of bone effects of ADT and evidence of bisphosphonate efficacy. We examined rates of bisphosphonate prescriptions in men initiating ADT in Ontario, Canada, between 1995 and 2012.

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