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Correction
September 4, 2019

Clarification of Reporting of Potential Conflicts of Interest in 2 Articles

JAMA. Published online September 4, 2019. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.14523

In the Viewpoint titled “Ten Steps the Federal Government Should Take Now to Reverse the Opioid Addiction Epidemic” published in the October 24/31, 2017, issue and in the Letter titled “Government Actions to Curb the Opioid Epidemic—Reply” published in the April 17, 2018, issue of JAMA, an author’s potential conflicts of interest disclosure statement was incomplete. In the Viewpoint,1 the disclosure statement should have read as follows: “Dr Kolodny reported that he is the executive director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP) and serves as an expert witness in malpractice cases involving opioid prescribing.” For the Letter,2 the disclosure statement should have read: “Dr Kolodny reported being the executive director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing; serves as a medical expert for states and counties that have filed suits against opioid manufacturers and as an expert witness in malpractice cases involving opioid prescribing; and being the former chief medical officer of Phoenix House, a nonprofit addiction treatment agency.” These articles have been corrected online and a letter of explanation appears in this issue.3

References
1.
Kolodny  A, Frieden  TR.  Ten steps the federal government should take now to reverse the opioid addiction epidemic.  JAMA. 2017;318(16):1537-1538. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.14567PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Kolodny  A, Frieden  TR.  Government actions to curb the opioid epidemic—reply.  JAMA. 2018;319(15):1620-1621. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.0745PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Kolodny  A.  Clarification of reporting of potential conflicts of interest in JAMA articles  [published September 24, 2019].  JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.12743Google Scholar
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