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Figure.  Distribution by Age Group of Adult Patients Admitted to General Ward and Intensive Care Unit With Coronavirus Disease 2019
Distribution by Age Group of Adult Patients Admitted to General Ward and Intensive Care Unit With Coronavirus Disease 2019

Patients treated in intermediate care units are grouped under general ward.

Table.  Characteristics of Adult Patients Hospitalized With Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Northern Californiaa
Characteristics of Adult Patients Hospitalized With Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Northern Californiaa
1.
Arentz  M, Yim  E, Klaff  L,  et al.  Characteristics and outcomes of 21 critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Washington state.   JAMA. Published online March 19, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4326PubMedGoogle Scholar
2.
Escobar  GJ, Gardner  MN, Greene  JD, Draper  D, Kipnis  P.  Risk-adjusting hospital mortality using a comprehensive electronic record in an integrated health care delivery system.   Med Care. 2013;51(5):446-453. doi:10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182881c8ePubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Severe outcomes among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)—United States, February 12-March 16, 2020. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Updated March 27, 2020. Accessed March 27, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912e2.htm
4.
Grasselli  G, Zangrillo  A, Zanella  A,  et al; COVID-19 Lombardy ICU Network.  Baseline characteristics and outcomes of 1591 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 admitted to ICUs of the Lombardy Region, Italy.   JAMA. Published online April 6, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.5394PubMedGoogle Scholar
5.
Guan  WJ, Ni  ZY, Hu  Y,  et al; China Medical Treatment Expert Group for Covid-19.  Clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 in China.   N Engl J Med. Published online February 28, 2020. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2002032PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    2 Comments for this article
    What treatment?
    George Anstadt, MD | University of Rochester
    Please share how these folks were cared for. Many us us are engaged in the clinical practice of medicine. We are looking into the eyes of critically ill and dying patients, and need feedback even if it is not yet definitive. Will you please put a comment here for us?

    Thanks for sharing.
    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None Reported
    Mortality rates by age group
    Brian Coyle |
    Thank you for this research. ICU by age group is presented, but not mortality. Also, comorbidities are listed, but not by age. Both are needed before drawing conclusions about age group risk.
    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None Reported
    Views 54,359
    Citations 0
    Research Letter
    April 24, 2020

    Characteristics of Hospitalized Adults With COVID-19 in an Integrated Health Care System in California

    Author Affiliations
    • 1The Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland
    JAMA. Published online April 24, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7202

    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in increased hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) use. In the United States, few reports have characterized patients treated outside of the ICU.1 Northern California was an early epicenter of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) community transmission in the United States. We report hospitalization and ICU admissions from Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC), a regional integrated health care system serving 4.4 million members, constituting 30% of the area’s insured population.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective cohort study of adults (≥18 years) with nasal/throat swabs positive for SARS-CoV-2 by polymerase chain reaction hospitalized between March 1, 2020, and March 31, 2020, at 21 KPNC hospitals. Tests were approved by infectious disease physicians based on public health and local guidelines. Patients were triaged according to clinician judgment. No patients were lost to follow-up.

    We characterized patients by demographics, comorbid disease,2 severity of illness,2 ICU use, laboratory/chest film data, and highest level of respiratory support. Patients were treated according to national guidelines for pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report numbers (percentages) for binary/categorical variables and medians (interquartile ranges) for continuous variables. As of April 9, 2020, 14.8% of the cohort was still hospitalized. In-hospital mortality estimates were calculated for patients with discharge dispositions as of April 9, 2020.

    The KPNC institutional review board approved the project with a waiver of informed consent.

    Results

    Of 16 201 tests in adults, results from 1299 patients (8.0%) were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Of these patients, 377 (29.0%) were treated as inpatients and 113 (8.7%) were treated in the ICU.

    The median age was 61.0 years (interquartile range, 50.0-73.0); 56.2% were men (Table). The most common comorbidity was hypertension (n = 164, 43.5%). Of 166 patients who underwent testing for influenza A/B or respiratory syncytial virus (44.0% of the cohort), none tested positive. Bilateral infiltrates on chest film were seen in 63.4% (n = 239). Overall, 34 patients (9.0%) received a prednisone-equivalent dosage of 20 mg/d or more.

    Most patients were treated on the general ward or intermediate care unit (n = 264, 70.0%); of whom 54.9% received supplemental oxygen through nasal cannula/face mask. A total of 113 inpatients (30.0%) required ICU admission and 110 (29.2%) received invasive mechanical ventilation.

    Patients aged 60 to 69 years represented the most common age group both hospitalized (n = 93, 24.6%) and admitted to the ICU (n = 31, 27.4%) (Figure). However, adults of all ages were admitted, and the proportion of younger and middle-aged adults (≤59 years) who were hospitalized (n = 172, 45.6%) was similar to the proportion of older adults (≥60 years) who were hospitalized (n = 205, 54.4%).

    Of 321 patients with discharge dispositions, 50 (15.6%) died in the hospital. Of 253 patients treated on the ward with discharge dispositions, 16 (6.3%) died. Of 68 patients treated in the ICU with discharge dispositions, 34 (50.0%) died.

    Discussion

    Estimates of patients with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results who were (1) admitted to a KPNC hospital (29.0%) and (2) treated in an ICU (8.7%) are broadly similar to those from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (21%-31% and 5%-12%, respectively) and contain less missing data.3 The KPNC estimate of ICU admissions using positive tests as denominator (8.7%) is lower than Italy (12%)4 but higher than China (5%).5 Given the differences in care among countries, it is important to report data from the United States. The KPNC mortality estimate is preliminary but reasonably consistent with the early Seattle, Washington, experience.1

    Unlike previous studies, adults across age groups, not just elderly individuals, required inpatient care, with persons aged 60 to 69 years most commonly hospitalized. These findings underscore the importance of public health interventions that prevent transmission for the entire public to mitigate hospital surges.

    The major limitation of this study is that these data represent an early phase of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in California. Several key factors were changing over this period, including implementation of physical distancing measures and testing speed, which could affect future results.

    Section Editor: Jody W. Zylke, MD, Deputy Editor.
    Back to top
    Article Information

    Corresponding Author: Laura C. Myers, MD, MPH, Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research and Systems Research Initiative, 2000 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94612 (laura.c.myers@kp.org).

    Published Online: April 24, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7202

    Author Contributions: Drs Myers and Liu had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

    Concept and design: All authors.

    Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Escobar, Liu.

    Drafting of the manuscript: Myers, Escobar, Liu.

    Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Parodi, Escobar, Liu.

    Statistical analysis: Myers.

    Obtained funding: Escobar, Liu.

    Administrative, technical, or material support: Parodi, Escobar, Liu.

    Supervision: Parodi, Escobar.

    Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Liu reported receiving a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R35GM128672) during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

    Funding/Support: This work was supported by The Permanente Medical Group Inc and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals Inc.

    Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

    References
    1.
    Arentz  M, Yim  E, Klaff  L,  et al.  Characteristics and outcomes of 21 critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Washington state.   JAMA. Published online March 19, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4326PubMedGoogle Scholar
    2.
    Escobar  GJ, Gardner  MN, Greene  JD, Draper  D, Kipnis  P.  Risk-adjusting hospital mortality using a comprehensive electronic record in an integrated health care delivery system.   Med Care. 2013;51(5):446-453. doi:10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182881c8ePubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
    3.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Severe outcomes among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)—United States, February 12-March 16, 2020. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Updated March 27, 2020. Accessed March 27, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912e2.htm
    4.
    Grasselli  G, Zangrillo  A, Zanella  A,  et al; COVID-19 Lombardy ICU Network.  Baseline characteristics and outcomes of 1591 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 admitted to ICUs of the Lombardy Region, Italy.   JAMA. Published online April 6, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.5394PubMedGoogle Scholar
    5.
    Guan  WJ, Ni  ZY, Hu  Y,  et al; China Medical Treatment Expert Group for Covid-19.  Clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 in China.   N Engl J Med. Published online February 28, 2020. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2002032PubMedGoogle Scholar
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