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Article
March 19, 1932

THE TEACHING OF RADIOLOGY TO INTERNS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1932;98(12):936-938. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730380004002
Abstract

The average physician cannot boast of great familiarity with the conduct or interpretation of roentgen examinations, or of adequate comprehension of the possibilities of diagnostic aid to be obtained from x-ray studies. His contact with x-ray problems consists in the main of emergency cases in which fractures or dislocations are suspected, and occasional reference of cases to x-ray laboratories for a "picture" of the lungs, stomach or urinary tract. He has not appreciated that, in addition to skeletal diseases and injuries, roentgen studies may be applied with advantage to nearly all visceral disorders, including many diseases of the nervous system. He does not stop to realize that examination with the x-rays is much more complicated than the simple taking of a "picture"; that it is really no more a simple laboratory procedure than an ophthalmic examination or a urinary tract examination or a gynecologic study, and that a clinical knowledge

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