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Article
March 19, 1932

TEACHING OF RADIOLOGY TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Radiological Clinic of the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania and the University Hospital, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1932;98(12):938-943. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730380006003
Abstract

Radiology occupies rather a unique position as a subject for teaching to undergraduate medical students. It is a new medical specialty. Its diagnostic and therapeutic applications have grown at a tremendous rate and have become unusually widespread. While it is more or less intimately concerned in every branch of medicine, its development has been left largely in the hands of a comparatively few medical men, assisted in a great measure by physicists and manufacturers of equipment. Its development and its position as a specialty have been taken largely for granted by the greater part of the medical profession. Comparatively few students or recent graduates expect to take it up as a specialty or even to practice it directly in a smaller way, although it must serve all of them. For these reasons, little earnest thought has been given to radiology from the standpoint of undergraduate teaching, aside from the desire

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