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Article
April 16, 1932

THE INTERNATIONAL TREATY CONTROLLING NARCOTIC DRUGS

JAMA. 1932;98(16):1379-1380. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730420037016
Abstract

On March 31 the United States Senate ratified the international treaty, previously mentioned in these columns,1 for limiting the manufacture of narcotic drugs. The treaty was the result of an international conference held at Geneva from May 27 to July 13, 1931. Fifty-five nations sent representatives. Delegates from the United States included Mr. John K. Caldwell of the State Department, Commissioner Harry J. Anslinger of the Bureau of Narcotics, Assistant Surgeon General Walter L. Treadway of the United States Public Health Service, and Senator Sanborn Young of California. These representatives deserve signal credit for negotiating an international agreement that should be far reaching in its effect on preventing the smuggling of contraband drugs into this and other countries.

The ratification of this treaty, subject to the reservations made at the time of signature, does not weaken or relax existing American measures for the control of the legal use of

References
1.
 The Geneva Convention of 1931, editorial ,  J. A. M. A. 97: 1801 ( (Dec. 12) ) 1931.Crossref
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