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Article
July 9, 1932

SOME UNTOWARD EFFECTS OF ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

JAMA. 1932;99(2):107. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740540015005

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Abstract

It has been emphasized many times that allergic responses may be precipitated or aggravated by a wide variety of agents. Ample evidence has been published to prove the importance of drugs in this connection. The one that receives most frequent mention—probably because of its widespread use—is acetylsalicylic acid. Not a few patients are aware of their clinical sensitivity to this drug before they consult an allergist; this was true in three of the four cases mentioned here and usually it is advisable to accept the patient's statement without further experimentation. A few brief reports of cases may emphasize this and other points.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —Mrs. C., white, aged 54, complained of a cough, paroxysms of dyspnea with wheezing, and frequent attacks of bronchitis.For fourteen or more years she had had attacks of bronchitis, and several years before her present illness her condition was diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis

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